History


The Library of Congress is ready to take die-hard baseball fans out to the (virtual) ballgame with this cornucopia of digital resources related to America 's favorite pastime. Visitors can get started by looking through the "Baseball History" facts on the right-hand side of the homepage, and then dive on in to some of the featured collections, which include "Baseball Cards, 1887-1914", the informative "Did You Know?" area, or a feature on the old chestnut, "Take Me Out to the Ball Game". Other materials can be found in the sections "Collections", "Images", and "Audio/Video". The "Audio/Video" area has some nice treats, including an 1898 film of a baseball game recorded by Thomas Edison and a talk by author Stephen Borelli about baseball broadcasting legend Mel Allen.


 

Developed as part of The Library of Congress's American Memory project, the site contains informative information about what happened on every day of the year. A visit to the site on any given date will lead to archival documents and brief commentaries of happenings about that particular date in history. For instance, the Kennedy-Nixon Debates (which took place on October 21), the premiere of "Hello, Dolly!"(January 16), as well as the 363 other days of the year. The site is quite a treat, and each "Today" contains links to various archival documents that have been offered up online as part of the American Memory project and other Library of Congress digitization initiatives


 

This site provides access to a rich collection of artifacts from ancient Syria, Israel, Persia, Anatolia, Egypt, Nubia, and Mesopotamia. It also has video clips on various topics including a virtual archaeological dig and how these ancient artifacts are cared for and preserved.


 

The site by The Ohio State University's history department contains primary sources and documents, original book reviews, digitized books, maps, and multimedia features. They cover topics such as the internment of Japanese-Americans in the United States during World War II and responses to immigration over the past 125 years.